Jumble Answers for 11/05/2020

OREPA = OPERA

KKANC = KNACK

NHRCCU = CRUNCH

TULEDI = DILUTE


CARTOON
ANSWER:

PICKUPS WERE INTRODUCED IN THE 1920S.  SINCE THEN, PEOPLE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO – – –

OPE KNK CRN IUTE = KEEP ON TRUCKIN

18 thoughts on “Jumble Answers for 11/05/2020

  1. Happy Thursday everyone! Nothing much to report in regards to the clue words this morning. It was 4 up and 4 down in no time flat! What I did find interesting was the fact that David had the first letter of the first two anagrams in the correct starting position. Usually that’s a big no-no in his construction of them. As for today’s hardest word, I’ll go ahead and join the fine folks that voted for DILUTE in the poll. It wasn’t that it gave me any trouble, it just didn’t pop out at me quite as fast as its counterparts.

    Now that’s an old Ford truck! It even had a hand crank sticking out of the engine compartment. I’m sure some of you remember having to give those things a whirl before heading out on the open road. That was never the case for me though. My only connection to hand cranks are the old stories that my grandfather used to tell. They’re a litte foggy now, but I seem to remember him telling me that he nearly broke his arm trying to get his car to start. Sometimes I wonder what the good in the good ole days stood for. It definitely wasn’t hand crankin’ your car in the freezing cold or rain!

    The final solve was an anagram consisting of 13-letters. I think it’s safe to say that you could consider it an unlucky amount of letters if you ran into trouble while solving it. The breakdown of consonants and vowels was 8 to 5. The apostrophe at the end of the layout coupled with UT brought TRUCKIN to mind. The rest of the answer rolled instantly off my tongue to put this one in the books. Have a terrific Thursday, and as always keep Jumbling!

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    • Hi Mike
      I did get a few kickbacks but what I did enjoy and found very handy is using the crank to slowly crank my wheels out of an icy patch or a slippery spot; that’s why I do miss the old crank and it should be there still!!!

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      • That does sound handy but not particularly useful for my needs. The only “old” thing I miss is my clothes washing machine. The newer ones are for the birds!

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      • I remember getting my my fingers caught in the manual wringer. I don’t miss that at all!Also bring the washing machine near the sink to discharge the water and also to connect to the water taps! No use for me!

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  2. Here are 10 Fun Facts about Trucks and Trucking:

    10. Truckers spend 240+ nights away from home each year.
    9. 18% of all the vehicles sold in the US are pickup trucks.
    8. The US halted the production of consumer trucks during WWII.
    7. Only 15% of truck owners use thier pickup trucks for work.
    6. The 1925 Ford Model T Runabout is considered the first pickup.
    5. The asking price for a 1925 Ford Model T Runabout was $281.
    4. A pickup truck in Romania is called a “slipper”.
    3. The Ford F-Series is the best selling truck in the US.
    2. If every Ford F-Series ever sold were parked back to back, the line of trucks would circle the earth three times.
    1. Approximately 6% of drivers in the trucking industry are women.

    Sources: The360mag.com, Americantruckdriving.com and businessinsider.com

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  3. Good Morning, Everyone. 🚚 A LITTLE TRAVELIN’ MUSIC 🚚

    🎶 And I’ll KEEP ON TRUCKIN’, Baby, I got to KEEP ON TRUCKIN’…I got to get to your good lovin’..Huh…huh…huh…huh…huh…🎶 “Keep On Truckin’” – Eddie Kendricks 1973
    https://tinyurl.com/y473qxyv

    Have a good one. Be well, and stay safe out there…🚚🙋🏻‍♀️

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  4. Good morning. Breezed right through the words but crashed on the cartoon answer. Kept thinking the crank to start the car had something to do with the answer. I couldn’t get Kick out of my head for the first word like in kick start. There is always tomorrow to recoup. Loved you facts Mike. Until tomorrow stay well and stay safe.

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    • You made an excellent observation in KICK, Paul. It’s just unfortunate that it didn’t pan out in your favor today.
      Glad you enjoyed the tidbits. 🙂

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  5. 🚚 They drove them on the country roads, but never to the OPERA,
    And I remember stories of old Ford’s from my Grand-Papa
    He never had one quite like this, with six kids all in tow
    They’d CRUNCH into the car…and happily off they would go…
    My Grandpa had a canny KNACK, of keeping kids amused,
    (And as a kid he’d give us wine…Cream soda DILUTE-fused)…
    But I digress…it don’t take much for me a memory stuck in…
    The old pickup I won’t de”ride”…It’s let us KEEP ON TRUCKIN’…🚚

    I found it amusing that the Grandfather mentioned the bed…but with cars and trucks not in my wheelhouse, I was driven to look into it. And I found this interesting… A pickup truck with a cab but no bed, is called a Chassis cab. And whoever thought to include that whimsical bit of dialogue? A chassis guy, 😉 in my opinion…🚚🙋🏻‍♀️

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  6. Hi Everyone – The answer wasn’t too hard for me because I know nothing about pickups and truck was the only relevant word I could think of. Like Paul, I thought the reference to the front of the pickup might have something to do with the answer. Knowing the Grateful Dead song “Truckin'” helped me.

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    • I’m in the same boat of having limited truck knowledge, Caroline. After reading your comment I can see how the final solution could have caused problems if the apostrophe was overlooked.

      Another cool fact that I learned today was that there’s no need for an apostrophe before the S in 1920s. The ‘ is only needed if you decide to drop the 19 and it indicates that something is missing (e.g. ‘20s). No idea why I shared that, but there you go. I hope I’ve made David’s parents proud!

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  7. No problem with the words or cartoon answer here. I did learn to drive on my Dad’s Chevy pickup truck because he wanted me to know how to drive a standard transmission. I too heard stories of folks throwing our their backs as well as their arms on hand crank cars. And now we have electric cars. We’ve come a long way haven’t we.

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  8. 🙇🏻‍♂️ Going to put the old 45 of “KEEP ON TRUCKIN’” on the turntable, he heard a CRUNCH underfoot as he accidentally stepped on his Grandmothers vintage OPERA album, and quickly poured himself a stiff drink, (not the time to DILUTE), remembering how bad she’d reacted the day he had broken her favorite Knick-KNACK…🙇🏻‍♂️

    🥃 He stood and watched him closely, this bartender mixing drinks
    And saw him DILUTE most of them, before the ice he’d sink…
    He had a KNACK for being slick, and when CRUNCH time was nigh,
    He really duped the drinkers here…and it caused him to sigh…
    With intermission over, and the OPERA starting up,
    He couldn’t help but think about these bogus liquor cups…
    This guy had quite a racket, all these drinks that he was muckin’,
    To each his own he figured…Name the game?…It’s KEEP ON TRUCKIN’…🥃

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  9. Got stuck with TRUNK… could not see TRUCK nor did I notice the (‘). I gave up! No patience today… the pandemic???
    Sooo beautiful today in Ottawa… my wife suggested that I wash the windows! What wife suggest is more of a command for me so….!
    Sooo nice outside!!!
    Enjoy

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  10. Hi all – As easy as a Monday puzzle.
    That was a ‘chassis’ guy in the back, Angela, with his classic fuzzy dice hanging from the mirror.

    Like Caroline I thought first of the Grateful Dead’s “Truckin’”, but I was more amused by the fact that the truck for sale exactly fits the line in Jan and Dean’s “Surf City”:
    🎵”Well, it ain’t got a back seat or a rear window
    But it still gets me where I wanna go”🎵

    Good wishes to everyone.

    “She liked to snack on cereal in her OPERA box and developed a KNACK for opening the package quietly, but discovered she had to DILUTE it with milk to keep the noisy CRUNCH down.”

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  11. Like some I couldn’t get to the solution but the anagrams fell into place easily. Did not realize there was an unwritten rule about not having the first letter of the word as first letter in the anagram but I go at the solutions by taking all the letters in and letting my mind’s eye re-arrange them and it usually works out. Thanks to Mike for all the extra info he brings to the discussion!

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