Jumble Answers for 09/12/2018

LAWOL = ALLOW

PIRMC = CRIMP

NROPES = PERSON

EGDANA = AGENDA

CARTOON ANSWER:

THE WRIGHT BROTHERS’ APPROACH TO AVIATION WAS – – –

ALLIMPPESNAEND = “PLANE” AND SIMPLE


Happy Wednesday, Jumble players! Today’s puzzle marks the halfway point of the week and the Jumble creators have decided to challenge us once again with a word in quotes. All of the clue words were recycled favorites, but the anagrams themselves were new. PERSON was the only word to give me some hesitation making it my pick for the most difficult anagram of the day. It’s also the oldest clue word in the lot with its last appearance in gameplay on 4/22/15.

Jumble artist, Jeff Knurek, brings us back once again to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina for a cartoon featuring the Wright brothers. Regular players of the game will almost instantly recognize the caricatures of Orville on the left and Wilbur on the wright, but who’s the gentleman in the middle? No, it’s not a third brother (although they did have one named Reuchlin). My best guess is that it’s Charles Taylor who was an employee and friend to the brothers.

Before the Wright brothers began their aeronautical pursuits, they first opened a bicycle business. They opened their shop in a building owned by an uncle of Mr. Taylor’s wife. Charles eventually went to work for them and was hired to build and fix bicycles. As the Wright brothers spent more time on their aviation endeavors, Charles was entrusted with running the place in their absence.

The Wrights turned to Taylor to build an engine for one of their Flyers when they were unable to find one that met their needs. Taylor built the engine in only six weeks and became a vital contributor to early Wright brothers’ airplanes. He’s often unmentioned and overshadowed by the successes of the brothers, but his mechanical skills were an integral part in the history of engine-driven flight.

There weren’t many details to be scene in today’s panel with Jeff relying on his caricatures to make it visually captivating. The attire of the characters gave it the feel of a period piece as did the paper schematics on the table.

The final solution was an enormous 14-letter anagram with one word in quotes. David did a sublime job in the layout making sure all of the words were kept cryptic. I decided to solve the middle word first with AND appearing to be the obvious choice. PLANE was easily deciphered next after noticing the visual clue in the cartoon. That left SIMPLE to complete the puzzle leaving us with a stinky, well thought out pun. Have a wonderful Wednesday, and I’ll see you tomorrow!

Advertisements